HISTORIC IDLEWILD: JAN 1 - 31
DOWNTOWN BLACK HISTORY TOUR
1 616 649 3778 NEW NUMBER! 87 Monroe Center Grand Rapids, MI 49503 HOURS: Tue.-Sat.: Noon - 5pm E-MAIL: george@graama.org
EXHIBITS NEWS GRANDMAS' VOICES EDUCATION SHOP 'N STUFF
PROMINENT & HISTORICAL ICONS OF GRAND RAPIDS
Rev. William Abney Paul Collins Xavier Davis DeBarges Stephen Drew Dr. Julius Franks Sherman D. Gillespie Al Green Adina Howard Dr. Randal Jelks Dr. Edward Jones Benjamin Logan II Elias Lumpkins, Jr. Buster Mathis, Jr. Paul Mayhue Floyd Mayweather, Jr. Joseph McMillan Montford Point Marines Rev. Lyman S. Parks W. L. Patterson Dr. Patricia Pulliam Ted Raspberry Roy Roberts Dr. Marvin Sapp Reuben Smartt Cedric Ward and more...
January 3, 1624

William Tucker was the first person of African ancestry born in the 13 British Colonies. His birth symbolized the beginnings of a distinct African American identity along the eastern coast of what would eventually become the United States.

According to the 1624-1625 Virginia Census, 22 Africans lived in Virginia at the time of Tucker’s birth. These first Africans in Virginia received the same rights, privileges, responsibilities, and punishments as their white indentured counterparts from Great Britain.

January 8, 1811

In 1811, Charles Deslondes was the leader of the largest slave revolt known as the German Coast Uprising. Deslondes led between 300-500 slaves wreaking havoc on the region, setting plantations on fire as they marched towards New Orleans, and recruited additional slaves, while white residents fled to the city of New Orleans or the backwoods. Deslondes was executed on January 15th. His body was mutilated, dismembered, and put on public display as a warning against other attempts at slave uprisings.

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"Museums hold the cultural wealth of the nation in trust for all generations and by its function and unique position, have become the cultural conscience of the nations." ~ Emmanuel N. Arinze
MLK/CIVIL RIGHTS KIOSK: JAN 1 - FEB 29
DEVOS HALL: JAN 21 - FEB 9
January 21, 1870

A freeman his entire life, Hiram Rhodes Revels was the first African American to serve in the U.S. Congress. With his moderate political orientation and oratorical skills honed from years as a preacher, Revels filled a vacant seat in the United States Senate in 1870. Republican Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts sized up the importance of the moment: “All men are created equal, says the great Declaration,” Sumner roared, “and now a great act attests this verity. Today we make the Declaration a reality….”

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